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Resolution: 1.14 arcsec The true FOV for 1000mm focal length telescope is 1.1° (82 ÷ 71.4 or 68 ÷ 62.5). 5.0 out of 5 starsDecent optics and easy to use. The few annoying niggles shouldn’t stop you having many … The Explore Scientific ED102 CF FCD1 uses HOYA Extra-Low-Dispersion (ED) Glass with Enhanced Multi-Coatings. Diameter: 120mm After many uses with this telescope, I have noticed the dew shield does not stay locked into place. My opinions of the eyepieces are available in this Explore Scientific Eyepiece Review. Explore Scientific Eyepiece Review When I first bought my first telescope in the 1970, there were many types of eyepieces to choose. Explore Scientific ED80 Review. This 80mm triplet “APO” holds a special place in my heart because it was my first real astrophotography telescope. The Orthoscopic is great for viewing planets and Ramsdens are still the safest (for the eyepiece) design to use for solar projection. The views through all four were superior the 15mm Plössl, where the stars were not as sharp near the edges. Free shipping on … I can highly recommend the Explore Scientific ED102 CF to astrophotographers and visual observers looking for a high-quality telescope that will deliver years of enjoyment. The eye relief is around 12mm with a field stop diameter of 18mm. If you’re into astrophotography, chances are that a short focal length apochromatic refractor is on your “to buy” list if you don’t already own one. Messier 42 is a great target for your DSLR and telescope, as even a stock (unmodified) camera will pick up the colorful details of this nebula in a short exposure. The focus distance of the ASI294 MC Pro and Explore Scientific ED 102. Dovetail: Vixen. Buyers must weigh those two factors before purchasing. Each had pros and cons. My interests are in deep-sky astrophotography. The current package for this telescope on B & H Photo includes a 90° Dielectric-Coated Star Diagonal. They also came with top and bottoms dust caps. Thus, I began a search for some high quality 1.25-inch eyepieces to augment my arsenal of 2-inch eyepieces. I also wanted one around 24mm to use in lieu of my similar focal length, but much heavier 26mm Nagler. Second, the 2-inch eyepieces are heavy. I don’t think you’re going to find better than this for the price. The Explore Scientific eyepieces, in fact are great—the new 14mm 100 o gives stunning views. I’ve been using this telescope for astrophotography from my backyard since May of 2016, and since then I have enjoyed the quality of the images produced with it. Over the course of 4 years, I photographed more than 50 deep-sky objects with it. by Joe Gilker of darkartsastro.ca/. The first one comes with a GoTo … Bracketing the Explore Scientific eyepieces are two Plössl eyepieces with similar focal lengths. Focal Ratio: f/7 I predominantly used Plössl eyepieces in the 1980s and 1990s. It provides a comfortable angle for visual observing as well, as you can rotate it in the focuser tube to find the perfect position for your height and viewing angle. The ED102 includes a built-in retractable dew shield, which blocks out stray light as well as protects the objective lens from moisture. When using the Explore Scientific ED 102 with a dedicated astronomy camera such as the ZWO ASI294MC-Pro, it can be difficult to find the correct focus distance at first. Each came in the typical foam-padded Explore Scientific box with the decorative star-chart covers. The other factor is cost. There are prized instruments for their elimination of chromatic aberration and high contrast, true colour images and the tool of choice for many astrophotographers. The 2″ dual-speed rack-and-pinion focuser works with a level of precision I became accustomed to after using the ED80. Before upgrading to the ED102, my primary astrophotography telescope was an Explore Scientific ED80. While the Explore Scientific eyepieces are notable beefier than the two Plössls, the Nagler and Ethos eyepieces dwarf them. After testing the two 68° and 82° Explore Scientific eyepieces, I decided to stick with the 82° eyepieces and bought two additional ones. So I expected to see the same view when interchanging them in the focuser, with the exception of the field being more spread out in the 82° eyepiece. When I first bought my first telescope in the 1970, there were many types of eyepieces to choose. Compare that to the weight of my massive 8″ Orion Astrograph Reflector which uses 2.5 counterweights at the very end of the counterweight shaft. Eye relief, exit pupils, and field of view (FOV) were much smaller than today’s offerings. My Explore Scientific ED 102 Carbon Fiber refractor. And to make it easier for you to get the most extensive news, articles and reviews that are only available in the magazine pages of Astronomy Technology Today, we are offering a 1 year subscription for only $6! The ED102 comes with an adjustable cradle with a Vixen-style dovetail mount. As you can see from this Explore Scientific Eyepiece Review I think I am finally set for life with high quality telescope eyepieces!

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